History of PSC

The Voice of the Government Services Industry…Since 1972

 When PSC was founded in 1972 by a group of industry leaders who recognized the emergence and growing vitality of the professional services sector, the sector itself was virtually unaccounted for as part of the U.S. economy and barely considered in the government marketplace. This despite the fact that, overall, it was growing at twice the rate of the rest of the economy and slowly but surely within the government as well. In the decades since, as the professional services sector has become an essential partner with the federal government in virtually all aspects of its operations, PSC has become its clear and consistent voice. In 2008, PSC and the Contract Services Association of America (CSA) merged to create a single, unified voice representing the full range and diversity of the government services sector.   

1972

National Council of Professional Services Firms in Free Enterprise (NCPSFE) founded with 35 members.

1972

Dr. Robert W. Krueger, president of PRC, becomes PSC’s first chairman.

1973

NCPSFE plays key roles on revised OMB Circular dictating policies for public/private competition and Council on Government Procurement Reform (CGPR) report

1974

Office of Federal Procurement Policy created

1974

William M. Wolf, president of Computer Business Management, becomes PSC chairman.

1975

NCPSFE leads successful fight against Service Contract Act amendment to require that wages for all professional employees working on government contracts be set by the Department of Labor

1976

NCPSFE leads successful campaign to derail FEDNET, which would have short-circuited the private sector by creating a massive, intra-agency marketing tool

1976

Frank W. Reilly, president of Macro Systems, becomes PSC chairman (first nine months).

1976

Joseph Lawler, president Camp Dresser & McKee International, becomes PSC chairman (last three months).

1977

NCPSFE renamed the Professional Services Council (PSC)

1977

Earle C. Williams, president and CEO of BDM International, becomes PSC chairman.

1979

PSC defeats Defense Department plan to create new FFRDC to support Star Wars

1980

PSC leads defeat of Consultant Reform Act of 1980 that would have halted all federal contractors and their employees

1980

Virginia Littlejohn becomes first PSC executive director.

1980

George Monroe, president of PRC Systems Services, becomes PSC chairman.

1980

PSC leads defeat of Consultant Reform Act that would have halted all federal contractors and their employees.

1980

PSC leads defeat of Consultant Reform Act that would have halted all federal contractors and their employees.

1981

NCPSFE renamed the Professional Services Council (PSC).

1981

Jack Aalseth, president of ERC, becomes PSC chairman.

1981

PSC helps coalesce industry to defeat the Taft Moratorium that would have required a moratorium on all Defense Department service contracting

1982

R. Michael McCullough, president of Booz Allen & Hamilton Inc., becomes PSC chairman.

1982

PSC plays key role in creation of the Business Alliance on Government Competition, a broad coalition to promote greater access to government markets

1982

Small Business Innovation and Research Act becomes law with PSC support.

1983

PSC is the driving force behind the creation of Standard Industrial Code 87—Engineering, Accounting, Research, Management and Related Services, a significant, substantive, and symbolic accomplishment

1985

The Bombay Group of USAID and World Bank contractors join PSC, and the PSC International Development Task Force is formed

1985

John M. Toups, president and CEO of PRC, Inc., becomes PSC chairman.

1986

PSC leases its own offices

1987

John “Jack” C. Rennie, chairman and CEO of Pacer Infotech, Inc., becomes PSC chairman.

1988

Mark Schultz joins PSC as Executive Director

1989

Phillip A Odeen, president and CEO of BDM International, becomes PSC chairman.

1990

Bert Concklin joins PSC as its first President

1990

PSC membership tops 113 members.

1991

The Bombay Group of USAID and World Bank contractors join PSC, and the PSC International Development Task Force is formed.

1991

Harvey D. Kushner, president of Kushner Management Planning, becomes PSC chairman.

1992

Bert Concklin joins as PSC’s first president

1992

Then CJCS Gen. Colin Powell addresses PSC.

1993

Dan R. Bannister, chairman of DynCorp, becomes PSC chairman.

1993

PSC major procurement reform advocacy reflected in Clinton Administration’s National Performance Review

1993

Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-N.M., addresses PSC members

1993

PSC helps guide revisions to the Standard Industrial Classification Codes and revisions to the definition of inherently governmental functions

1994

PSC leads the way on cost realism, and releases the first Cost Realism Manual

1994

PSC plays key role in drafting and pushing through Congress the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act (FASA), the most significant acquisition reform legislation

1995

Edward H. Bersoff, chairman of BTG Inc., becomes PSC chairman

1996

FASA success followed by passage of the Clinger/Cohen Act that provides for sweeping changes to federal management and procurement of information technology

1997

CG Appleby, Esq., senior vice president and deputy general counsel of Booz Allen & Hamilton Inc., becomes PSC chairman

1997

PSC’s decade-long advocacy of Best Value acquisition becomes a reality with the rewrite of Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 15

1997

PSC emerges as key leader on reforms to federal procurement protest rules, organizational conflict of interest rules, and past performance

1997

PSC works with Congress to craft contract bundling statutes that receive support from large and small businesses

1999

PSC leads industry efforts to promote changes to rules governing public/private competitions, including additional revisions to OMB Circular A-76

1999

J. Kenneth Driessen, chairman, president, and CEO of MRJ Technology Solutions, becomes PSC chairman

2000

PSC pushes through legislation that for the first time provides service contractors interest on late government payments

2001

Paul V. Lombardi, president and CEO of DynCorp, becomes PSC chairman

2001

Stan Soloway joins as PSC president. Later that year, Alan Chvotkin joins as executive vice president and counsel.

2001

PSC membership tops 140 companies for the first time; over 150 registrants (and 225 people total) attend the PSC Annual Conference

2001

PSC President Stan Soloway named to congressionally mandated Commercial Activities Panel, chaired by the Comptroller General that recommends to Congress far-reaching changes to A-76

2001

PSC's advocacy agenda is the top priority, but new, in-depth customer engagements emerge as PSC members’ knowledge and expertise are increasingly sought by agencies and components seeking best practices and transformational advice; key alliances formed with Department of Defense, Federal Aviation Administration, Treasury, HHS, USAID, Air Force, Navy, and more

2002

PSC leads industry negotiations with Congress and DoD on new rules governing GSA Schedules and Multiple Award Contract purchases

2003

Joseph M. Kampf, president and CEO of Anteon International Corporation, becomes PSC chairman

2003

PSC leads industry efforts to defeat the TRAC Act, the most dangerous anti-competition and anti-outsourcing legislation in more than a decade

2003

PSC leads industry negotiations with Congress and DoD on new rules governing GSA Schedules and Multiple Award Contract purchases

2003

PSC-led IPT (co-led by the directors of DCMA, DFAS, and DCAA) presents DoD leaders recommendations for improving contract formation, payment, and close-out processes

2004

PSC leads industry efforts on the President’s Millennium Challenge Account and SEC rules regarding completion accounting methods

2004

PSC-led IPT (co-led by the Directors of DCMA, DFAS, and DCAA) presents recommendations for improving contract formation, payment, and close-out processes.

2005

Stan Gutkowski, managing director of Washington D.C. operations at Accenture, becomes PSC chairman.

2005

PSC funds first ever study of the professional services industrial base; based on results, creates a working group that would become the Services Industry Competitiveness Committee

2006

Jim O’Neill, corporate vice president & president of Northrop Grumman, becomes PSC Chairman

2006

PSC tops 200 member companies

2006

PSC funds first ever study of the professional services industrial base; creates Services Industry Competitiveness Committee based on results.

2007

PSC celebrates 35th anniversary and promise of a bright future.

2008

PSC merges with the Contract Services Association, creating a unified voice for the industry. PSC membership tops 300

2008

Philip Nolan, president and CEO of Stanley Associates Inc., becomes PSC chairman.

2008

EMCOR’s Mike Shelton, chairman of CSA, serves as PSC Co-chairman.

2010

Mac Curtis, president and CEO of Vangent becomes PSC chairman

2010

PSC leads successful effort to eliminate harmful insourcing language from the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act and the 2011 Omnibus Appropriations Act that would have encouraged civilian agencies to increase insourcing of work currently and appropriately performed by the private sector

2011

PSC helps form the Coalition of International Development Companies to educate stakeholders about the important role for-profit firms play in international development

2011

PSC leads industry efforts to repeal the 3 percent tax withholding on contractors

2011

PSC comments on DoD’s business systems rules proposal results in significant improvements in DCAA and DCMA approach to audits; hosts discussion with DCAA, DCMA and DPAP leaders on the rules

2011

Paul Cofoni, president and CEO of CACI, becomes PSC chairman.

2012

PSC celebrates its 40th Anniversary and its continued advocacy leadership

2016

PSC surpasses 400 member companies